Tag Archives: healthy

Australian Ambassador – Food Revolution Foundation

I am so excited to announce I have just become an Australian Ambassador for the Food Revolution Foundation!

The Food Revolution Foundation was launched in 2010 by Jamie Oliver to fight the obesity epidemic, encourage people to get cooking again and make food education at the top of everyone’s agenda. At the heart of this foundation is everyone’s right to healthy food.

I am so proud to be involved in this awesome foundation!

Stay tuned for events and recipes …..

The New Food Pyramid

Food Pyramid

Food Pyramid

Exciting news in the Nutrition world is the official launch of the new Food Pyramid. After 15 years it has been updated!

 

The new pyramid separates each layer into 5 specific food groups. Plant based foods are still the “eat most” category; with fruit, vegetables and legumes in the largest layer.

The grain section now contains quinoa and soba noodles which reflects how our culture has evolved.

 However, my favourite alteration is the addition of herbs and spices. They are packed full of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals and an excellent flavour enhancer so less salt can be used.

 Only 7% of Australians eat enough vegetables and less than half consume enough fruit.

Quite simple, quite the fad diets and consume more plant matter.

With Love & Nourishment, Sharon xx

 

A Healthy Chocolate

There is something you may not know about me, I don’t like very sweet foods.

I use to love sultanas, their sticky sweetness sandwiched between apricots and almonds was my go to snack. Fast forward a number of years and quite frankly I’d prefer a bowl of crisp raw veggies. Seriously, what beats the crunch and refreshment of cucumber and celery.

However, after the gorgeous boost of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals there is space for some wholesome chocolate in the form of homemade chocolate bark. Even the virtuous are allowed a chocolatey snack occasionally 🙂

This recipe is easy peasy and mighty delicious. Sub any of the ingredients for other nuts, nut butters, seeds and dried fruit. You could even impress the guests with the addition of edible rose petals, lavender or freeze-dried raspberries. You are limited only by your imagination.

chocolate bark

Ingredients:

250mL Cacao Butter

2 Tablespoons Raw Cacao Powder

2 Tablespoons Honey

2 Tablespoons Peanut Butter

1/2 Cup Buckwheat Groats

1/3 Cup Almonds

1/3 Cup Goji Berries

Method:

Over a low heat, melt the cacao butter.

Once melted, remove from the heat.

Stir through all remaining ingredients. Set aside.

Line a flat tray with baking paper.

Pour the chocolate bark contents into the tray.

Place in the freezer until set.

Once set, break up into ‘bark’ pieces.

Store in the fridge.

 

 

Food Fads Worth Embracing

As a nutritionist, one phrase I despise is “food fad”. I’m obviously in support of food, so the food component is fab. But add a fad to the end and suddenly everything changes.

apples

Really, another one?

Food fads are usually heralded by minions shouting “I SAVED MY LIFE THANKS TO …” only to be forgotten two minutes later when the next magic pill arrives.

One delivery followed by another; weight-loss pills, the key to anti-ageing, potions for eternal bliss, scents to stave off hunger, superfoods to make you shine, elixirs to boost your metabolism, and so on. It still amazes me what desperate measures some individuals take in the name of health.

So what’s wrong with a little fad? The main qualm I have with fads is their tendency to encourage obsessive behaviours. Such actions are unsustainable in the long term and facilitate poor self-esteem.

I wholeheartedly support proactive health measures and preventative nutrition. However, there is no need to increase the mortgage on your house to fund these exclusive potions.

Miracle Pill

There is no such thing as a miracle pill

 

Look at Mother Nature

One fad that has been around for some time and is probably more a way of life than a fad is the kitchen garden program offered by many primary schools. Thanks to the vision of Stephanie Alexander and her desire to provide regular kitchen and garden classes to children, the next generation is learning vital skills for optimal well-being and healthy living.

Teaching a child how to love and nurture vegetables is crucial for their future health.

I appreciate that maths, geography, history and the like are essential to the school curriculum. However, teach a child how to grow tomatoes and show them some kitchen recipes that transform these beautiful sweet morsels into delicacies and you will improve their lives. It will encourage them to develop a healthy relationship with food and a positive regard for their body. This is turn will boost their self-esteem.

Fresh Turmeric

Fresh Turmeric

Self love

A child with food knowledge and kitchen skills is more likely to develop into a physically active healthy adult. They are more likely to consume wholesome foods regularly and respect and nurture their body.

Contrast this with a young adult lacking in basic food knowledge. They are often the yo-yo dieter who loathes their body.

I spend much of my time in schools and corporate offices giving nutrition seminars and running wellness programs. Adults who were encouraged as children to take part in food preparation and cooking lead healthier lifestyles as they grow.

But if you weren’t a child of home harvesters, it is not all doom and gloom. There’s no time like the present to start.

Fast fads & detoxes

Drastic fad diets and detoxes might facilitate short-term weight loss. Yet fast forward two years and it’s likely all lost weight plus more has appeared. Glorifying short-term skinniness is like celebrating the success of a cheater. The truth will eventually out in the most inconvenient circumstances, such as a burst zip, when the weight reappears.

A final message

Stop over-complicating everything.

Seek professional help if you would like a targeted approach unique to your lifestyle. Otherwise, simply consume far more vegetables than you think you need. You might notice the improvements to your health. You might even notice your skin develops a radiant shine that the $350 superfood failed to deliver.

And, with love and kindness, please drink some water.

Disclaimer: I am not associated with Stephanie Alexander or her programs, nor do I receive royalties or bonuses for promotion.

My Piece Published in The Weekly Review 14th March 2015

Honesty is the Best Policy

Something honest and authentic….

Many claim to be nutrition and health “experts” yet what they offer is shonky claims based on nothing but hocus pocus. I don’t follow the status quo just to win popularity contests. Your health and wellbeing is far too important and so is mine.

photo (4)

I prefer to let my work and achievements speak for themselves rather than dismiss specific individuals, products or services that oppose my core principles.
But the truth is, for too long my industry has been attacked by “experts” with no basic nutrition education and training.

Nutrition science is far more complicated than coconut oil, kale smoothies and chia pudding.

Chia Pudding

Chia Pudding

I am a Registered Nutritionist, registered with a professional body. (See here)

Every three years I need to accrue a minimum of 300 continuing professional development points in order to retain my registration; even though I have studied nutrition for over 6 years, have 2 nutrition degrees (one undergrad and one postgrad) and have been in this industry for more years than my young face may indicate.

I don’t say that to satisfy my ego, you simply deserve to know what my qualifications and credentials are. It is why I pride myself on honesty and authenticity.

And so with that, I have just received my updated certificate, registering me for the next three years.

Happy Days xx

Nutrition Society of Australia Registration Certificate

Nutrition Society of Australia Registration Certificate

Sugar or Agave (Cactus)

A little wellbeing tip for the morning…

Agave (also referred to as Agave Nectar/Syrup) is not a health(y) food!!

Commonly considered a nourishing replacement for sugar, it has found its way into numerous recipes and raw desserts. Agave is derived from a cactus plant, and therefore some consider it to be “natural”.

However, in actual fact, the finished product undergoes far too much processing and does not resemble the natural cactus of its origin.

Yes, agave may be low GI and therefore considered beneficial for diabetics. For your information, my laundry detergent is also low GI but you don’t see me recommending that to my clients.

Nutrition Blogger Resource

I’m delighted to share that my blog “Love, Respect, Nourish by Sharon’s Nutrition” was invited to join the newly launched Storehouse, an online blogger directory of nutrition professionals.

Storehouse-Logo

There is conflicting and inaccurate health and wellness information publicised in the media. If followed, there may be disastrous consequences to one’s health.

As such, this resource was created to house highly qualified and credible nutrition professionals and bloggers; with recognised nutrition education, training and skills that you can trust.

I’m honoured and humbled to be included in this list.

I’d love you to take a look and let me know what you think xx